A Public Private Partnership (PPP) is a risk-sharing contractual arrangement by which the public and private sectors aggregate their competencies and resources in order to offer better infrastructure and public services.

PPP’s recognise that there are some activities that the public sector does best and other activities where the private sector has more to offer. Only by allowing each sector to focus upon what it does best can the Government provide the quality services that the public want and expect. We have advised governments and private clients on preparing and implementing PPP projects. We have advised financial institutions on the development of PPP funds, funds that are established specifically for the purpose of investing in PPP.

We contribute during two phases in such a partnership: the preparatory phase and the implementation phase.

In the preparatory phase, the partnership idea is discussed and developed. We can help you define your project criteria and selection, identify potential partners and build consortia, benchmarking your initiatives with competitors worldwide, especially in the key area of Corporate Social Responsibility.

In the implementation phase, we manage projects, engage with partners (including public institutions), and provide communication and public relations support. We ensure the sustainability of your project by introducing a dedicated funding strategy for financing innovation, training, education, dissemination and the development of CSR tools.

Mulago Government Refferal Hospital
Types of Projects

Physical Infrastructure

PPP's may be used for a wide variety of projects, provided that they are justified by a demand or existing need for which a business case can be made, and the proposed partnership does not compromise government’s financial targets. The project may involve the delivery of physical infrastructure or ancillary services.

Ancillary Services

Transport - roads; light rail; ports; airports; water & sewerage treatment plants; schools; hospitals; defence; residential housing; government offices; conference centres; sports stadia and leisure facilities; prisons, etc.

Capabilities

  • Promoting a wider understanding of the principles of the PPP within the public sector;
  • Setting a framework for identifying projects that are suitable/not suitable for PPP (including selection of pilot projects);
  • Acting as a one-stop advice centre for potential private sector bidders/investors;
  • Developing templates (such as standard contractual terms) for addressing problems that arise on PPP projects;
  • Identifying ways in which the public sector can use PPP to provide more and better services; etc.
  • Managing projects and engaging with partners